UK MoD slams BBC Panorama program for putting ‘armed forces personnel at risk’ — MercoPress

UK MoD criticizes BBC Panorama program for putting ‘armed forces personnel at risk’

Wednesday July 13, 2022 – 09:14 UTC


The MOD has issued a strong statement criticizing the “unwarranted conclusions” in an upcoming documentary, “SAS Death Squads Exposed: A British War Crime?”

British Armed Forces personnel have been put “both in the field and in reputation at risk” by the BBC Panorama episode of SAS operations in Afghanistan, the Ministry of Defense (MOD) has said. The MOD has issued a strong statement criticizing the “unwarranted conclusions” in an upcoming hour-long documentary, titled SAS Death Squads Exposed: A British War Crime?

British armed forces personnel have been put “in danger both in the field and in their reputation” by BBC Panorama‘s episode on SAS operations in Afghanistan, the Ministry of Defense (MOD) said. The MOD has issued a strong statement criticizing the “unwarranted conclusions” in an upcoming hour-long documentary, titled SAS Death Squads Exposed: A British War Crime?

It will focus on whether some of the “hundreds of people” killed in nighttime raids by special forces in Afghanistan were, in fact, executions. The BBC documentary accuses the SAS of executing detainees and murdering unarmed people in Afghanistan.

He claims to have discovered that a unit killed 54 people in suspicious circumstances and that senior officers did not release evidence to the military police.

“We believe that BBC The Panorama episode on SAS operations in Afghanistan, scheduled to air on Tuesday, July 12, 2022, draws unwarranted conclusions from allegations that have already been thoroughly investigated.

The MOD said it “provided a detailed and comprehensive statement to Panorama, unequivocally highlighting how two service police operations conducted a thorough and independent investigation into allegations relating to the conduct of British forces in Afghanistan”.

“No investigation has found sufficient evidence to prosecute,” the MOD said. “To suggest otherwise is irresponsible, incorrect and endangers our brave Armed Forces personnel both in the field and in terms of reputation,” he added.

The MOD concluded its statement by reiterating that there would be “no obstruction” in considering any new evidence.

“The MoD, of course, is open to reviewing any new evidence, there would be no obstruction.

“We will always investigate allegations thoroughly, but our independent police and prosecutors can only act on the evidence they have,” the MOD said.

The Special Air Service (SAS) is a well-known, but secretive organization. A careful balance is maintained, with the SAS recruiting high caliber candidates from across the British Army (although mainly from the Army, and in particular the Paras) and its assignments attracting intense media attention.

However, the exact details of the operations and who performs them usually don’t become public until years later, if at all.

SAS personnel are highly trained and renowned for their skills in covert surveillance, close combat and hostage rescue.

The SAS was created during World War II when small bands of soldiers were dropped behind enemy lines in North Africa and Europe.