Boris Johnson refuses to commit to halting the fall in the size of the armed forces

Boris Johnson has insisted Britain will still have ‘enough troops’ today amid a row with the military and politicians over service cuts and the threat of the Russia.

The prime minister has refused to commit to reversing cuts in the size of the British army despite a blunt warning this week from the service’s top soldier.

In a dramatic intervention, General Sir Patrick Sanders said the country was facing a ‘1937 moment’ in the face of Vladimir Putin’s ‘brutal aggression’ – a reference to the notorious policy of ceding ground to the German dictator before World War II.

The Chief of the General Staff said Britain must be prepared to “fight and win” rather than repeat the appeasement mistakes that left Hitler on the loose.

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace also demanded a huge increase in defense spending this week, putting him at odds with No 10. Defense chiefs carried out a major review of the armed forces last year , before the start of the war in Ukraine.

It will see the effective strength of the British army reduced to 72,500 soldiers by 2025, the lowest number since the Napoleonic war 200 years ago.

He came as the British Army launched a recruitment drive with a rather pointed title. The campaign titled Nothing can do what a soldier can do contains the message that if new technologies are used by troops in combat, the future of British defense will be supported by soldiers.

Asked about the cuts by LBC radio today, Mr Johnson said: ‘Of course you have to have a big enough army. You have to have enough troops, you have to have enough muscle power to do what you need to do. It is critical.

“We will never make concessions there. But you also need to make sure that the troops you have are properly equipped…

The prime minister has refused to commit to reversing cuts in the size of the British army despite a blunt warning this week from the service’s top soldier.

He came as the British Army launched a recruitment drive with a rather pointed title.  The campaign titled Nothing can do what a soldier can do contains the message that if new technologies are used by troops in combat, the future of British defense will be supported by soldiers.

He came as the British Army launched a recruitment drive with a rather pointed title. The campaign titled Nothing can do what a soldier can do contains the message that if new technologies are used by troops in combat, the future of British defense will be supported by soldiers.

“Secondly, remember that when we actually go into combat, we go into combat as an alliance and the UK will generally be well ahead in terms of…look at our naval contributions.” Huge. Look what we can do on cyber.

It came after Mr Johnson pledged last night to increase defense spending to counter aggression from Russia.

At a press conference closing the NATO summit in Madrid, the Prime Minister announced that the UK would spend 2.5% of its GDP on defense by the end of the decade.

Mr Johnson insisted that budgets would significantly exceed the alliance’s 2% target in coming years as the government is “investing for the long term” in response to the threat from Russia.

Prime Minister later revealed extent of Mr Putin’s ‘saber dealings’ but warned against dragging the West into Russian president’s depiction of a ‘Russia vs NATO’ conflict .

The Prime Minister’s proposed hike in defense spending to 2.5% of GDP would equate to around £10billion extra a year at current prices by 2030 – with experts warning this could mean taxes will have to increase further to meet the commitment.

Based on the Office for Budget Responsibility’s forecast for the size of the economy, there will be £55.1bn of extra spending over the rest of the decade.

However, Mr Johnson still questioned why the size of the army was being reduced, arguing the priority was ‘to have a brilliantly equipped armed forces’.

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace has repeatedly called for increased military spending to counter the Russian threat.

He warned at a RUSI think tank event that the defense can no longer exist on a ‘regime of smoke and mirrors’, pointing out that ministers had behaved like ‘corporate raiders’ during decades as they diverted money to the NHS and other services.

Senior Tory MP Tobias Ellwood said pledging to increase spending to 2.5% of GDP by the end of the decade is “too little too late”.

The chairman of the Commons Defense Committee tweeted: ‘Now is NOT the time to cut the army by 10,000’.

“And moving to 2.5% defense spending by 2030 is too little too late.”

Calls for arms came after NATO said it was increasing the number of troops on high alert from 40,000 to 300,000 troops and sending more heavy weapons to its flank Oriental.

Alliance Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg called it “the biggest overhaul of our collective defense and deterrence since the Cold War”.

In a speech on Tuesday, General Sir Patrick Sanders, Chief of the General Staff, will say he has never seen such a clear threat to peace and democracy as

In a speech on Tuesday, General Sir Patrick Sanders, Chief of the General Staff, will say he had never seen such a clear threat to peace and democracy as the “brutal aggression” of Russian President Vladimir Cheese fries.

A one-minute video ad, to be released in cinemas, on TV and online, shows a dystopian future where a robotic soldier explores the terrain of a conflict zone, made up of over 4,000 individual CGI elements and over 2,000 sound design samples.

The ending shows that while technology is important, only soldiers can make instinctive decisions on the ground in a conflict zone.

As part of the campaign, striking images of soldiers and robots will be displayed on billboards.

The campaign is the sixth iteration in the “This is Belonging” series developed by Accenture Song in conjunction with Capita and the British Army.

Colonel Nick Mackenzie, Deputy Director of Recruitment, said: “Like previous recruitment drives, Nothing Can Do What A Soldier Can Do aims to dispel one of the many myths that surround the British Army.”

“This time looking at the British Army of the future and the role of soldiers within it.

“We want to tell future recruits that no matter what technological advances we make, it is the judgment, intelligence and even the minds of our soldiers that are vital to the future of the military.

“We hope the campaign leads potential candidates to see the military as an exciting place where they can learn and grow, and be valued as part of our future.”